Assessment for Learning Conference

Hotel Del Coronado

1500 Orange Ave, 

Coronado, CA 92118

© 2020 Created by Gather&Create for the Assessment for Learning Project

Join the movement to fundamentally #RethinkAssessment

San Diego, California
Feb 11-13, 2020
Assessment for Equity. Assessment for Agency. Assessment for Learning.

Join Us

For the past three years, the educators and system leaders of the Assessment for Learning Project have been designing, learning, and innovating together to reimagine what’s possible for assessment. Join us in San Diego and become part of the dynamic and growing Assessment for Learning Community.

Meet the ALP Learning Community

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I found in this community, there is a fearlessness. There is an assumption of best intentions. We are really able to push each other and be provocative.... Somehow they convinced me that I had permission to learn, that I wouldn’t be penalized if things didn’t go as we projected. That has made a huge, huge difference. This is literally the most interesting work I’ve done in my professional life."

ALP Grantee

What Will We Learn Together?

During the conference we will “walk the talk” of assessment for learning. You will build on existing expertise and set personal goals, reflect regularly, and share learning with peers traveling a similar path. There will be workshops created by the ALP Learning Community in four practice-based strands curated by national leaders in assessment for learning:

 

 

These workshop sessions are designed by educators and will blend practical tools and Shared Learnings from ALP.

The goal of all this learning will be to reframe thinking about assessment while grounding learning in proven practice. A focus on how policy, culture, and leadership can help create enabling conditions to support assessment for learning will also be covered because without them making a lasting change is impossible.

Full agenda coming soon!

 

Who is this conference for?

Educators and system leaders who ask big questions like:

  • What if assessment helped put every student in charge of their learning?

  • How might assessment celebrate and affirm each student’s identity?

  • How can we build classroom cultures of continual reflection and feedback? 

  • How can we design assessments to be both rigorous AND engaging?

  • How might we assess complex skills like problem-solving and critical thinking? 

  • How do we assess social and emotional learning responsibly?

  • How might communities shape their assessments systems based on a shared vision or learning, rather than a high-stakes test?

Listen to Aiden, Del Lago students, and WestEd students talk about their learning and see why these questions are so important now.

About ALP

The Assessment for Learning Project (ALP) is a nationwide grantmaking and field-building initiative inviting educators and systems leaders to fundamentally rethink the role of assessment to advance student learning and improve our K-12 public schools. Since launching in 2015, ALP has awarded 28 project teams with grants ranging from $15,000 to $750,000, along with ongoing personalized coaching and technical assistance. Grantee teams are joined by technical experts and other field leaders in a national learning community, a dynamic network representing all levels of the United States' education system collectively working to #rethinkassessment.

ALP is led by the Center for Innovation in Education in partnership with Next Generation Learning Challenges and design parter 2Revolutions. The Assessment for Learning Conference is produced by ALP in partnership with Envision Learning Partners and Leadership & Design.

What problem(s) are we trying to solve?

  • Traditional assessment systems measure only a fraction of what matters most to individuals and communities – namely, the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are essential for student success;

  • Assessment is too often done to students rather than with them;

  • Educators are not sufficiently prepared nor empowered to determine the most appropriate roles for assessment in support of learning.

  • Assessment is too often treated as an event rather than a process, isolated from instruction and conflated with accountability; and

  • Decades of using assessment as a neutral observer of inequity – measuring and monitoring achievement gaps – has done little to actually create more equitable learning environments.